DIY Spooky Spider

Oct 28, 2013 No Comments by

 

The Spooky Spider is sure to delight anyone of all ages..

The Spooky Spider is sure to delight anyone of all ages..

Something about Halloween brings out the vindictive creativity in me. In year’s past, I would convert a helicopter in the form of a spider. However, there was something about a flying lawn mower around Trick-o-Treaters that just didn’t seem too safe (you think!!).

This year, I came up with a project that would take less than an hour, provide a safe experience and be blast at the prime opportune moment….

I have one of the “Blade Nano QX Bind-N-Fly” quad copters. To convert it into a Spooky Spider, I came up with a list of items I would need and visited the local craft store.

Material list included:

  • One, 2” plastic foam ball, for the main body.
  • One, 15/16” plastic foam ball, for the head.
  • One small bag of 1/8” eyes. All you need is two or more, depending on your imagination.
  • Black pipe cleaners.
  • Yellow pipe cleaners.
  • Small glue-gun.
  • Glue sticks.
  • Craft paint of your choice.
  • Hobby knife. #11 is recommended.
The remaining "parts" needed to complete the project...

“Parts” needed for the project…

Heat up the glue gun and prepare the head and body...

Heat up the glue gun and prepare the head and body…

I started out with the main body, slicing off about 1/3 of the ball. This allowed flat surface for me to trace out the shape of the Nano QX fuselage and the 4 arms. I will cut out a cavity from the area, allowing the body to slip over the entire frame.

Slice about 1/3rd of the ball off to establish the base of the Spider body.

Slice about 1/3rd of the ball off to establish the base of the Spider body. I used a band saw. The same result can be achieved using rough sandpaper.

Trace out the contour of the nano QX onto the body.

Trace out the contour of the Nano QX onto the body.

Turning the flat side up, and with the Nano QX canopy removed, I held the frame in the center of the flat surface and traced out the contour, using a #2 pencil.

Using a hobby knife, cut and chip out the inside area...

Using a hobby knife, cut and chip out the inside area…

The finished result, after chipping away the inside area.

The finished result, after chipping away the inside area.

Using a hobby knife, I followed the lines, cutting into the material, about ¼”. It is important to cut from the outside edge, working towards the center. This will prevent the tendency to “chip out” the edges of the ball.

Once the traced lines have been cut, I begin to hallow out the inside of the lines, again working from the outside-in. When I finish, there will be a cavity matching the main fuselage and arms. The finished ball should slip over the main fuselage, ending up flush with the bottom edges of the frame. Trim as needed to achieve the desired results.

Check-fit the body and trim as necessary to get a good fit.

Check-fit the body and trim as necessary to get a good fit.

Make sure the body clears all propellers. There should be about a 1/8" clearance on all blades

Make sure the body clears all propellers. There should be about a 1/8″ clearance on all blades

 

Once the body has been fitted to the frame, there should be approximately 1/8” clearance between the body and all four props.

Add a small amount of Hot-Glue and attach the head to the main body.

Add a small amount of Hot-Glue and attach the head to the main body.

Now it’s time to attach the head. I sanded a small flat area on the head to increase the mounting surface. Using the glue gun, I applied a small amount of “Hot glue” to the area and immediately attached the head to the main body. The plastic foam material is, for the most part, resistant to the hot glue-stick but the same cannot be said about the tip of the glue gun itself.

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Once the glue of attaching the head, had time to cool, it’s time to paint the body. I used a water-based, flat-black craft paint for my project. Use your imagination to go from here, or just follow what I did and decorate the body any way you want.

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Be sure to cut a channel for the battery, at the front edge of the body. Here is a view of my project after I completed it, showing the underside and battery location. I used very small dabs of hot-glue to the bottom edges, holding the body onto the frame.

After the paint dried, I attached the eyes, using the glue gun. This proved to be a challenge, trying to hold very small pieces with something other than my fingers, to avoid getting burned.

I cut the 12-inch black pipe cleaners (legs) in half. Since the quad already has 4 arms, I decided 4-legs would be acceptable. Poke each leg into  the upper-sides of the body, Use two cleaners per side to keep the balance right.

Manomorphic process complete.

Manomorphic process is complete.

What started out as a total weight of 18 grams, the completed project added only 4 grams to the Nano QX.

The Spooky Spider is complete and ready for action...

The Spooky Spider is complete and ready for action…

Flying Spooky requires a little more power to get him airborne, with plenty reserve for those evasive maneuvers necessary to avoid the “swatters”. Flying it outside is still easy but the air movement will have more of an effect, due to the increased “area” created by the legs and larger body….ENJOY!

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About the author

I have been interested in model airplanes for as long as I can remember. I have met some interesting and good people during my modeling career. I am grateful to all those who helped me learn to fly, were willing to lend a hand, offer a screw now and then and just being there to listen. Modeling is an activity that returns large dividends in so many ways!!
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