Model Airplane News http://www.modelairplanenews.com The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips. Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:01:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Happy Thanksgiving! http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/26/happy-thanksgiving/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/26/happy-thanksgiving/#comments Wed, 26 Nov 2014 19:01:03 +0000 Model Airplane News http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230630

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

RC Turkey copy

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/26/happy-thanksgiving/feed/ 0
Great Planes P-51 Mustang Sport Fighter .46/EP ARF http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/great-planes-p-51-mustang-sport-fighter-46ep-arf/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/great-planes-p-51-mustang-sport-fighter-46ep-arf/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:27:37 +0000 Trevor "Chilly" Duncan http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230616

Superior speed and design gave the Mustang an edge in the air over all other contemporary prop fighter designs. Its superior range enabled it to strike targets all the way into Germany. With this Sport Fighter model of the exemplary original, you get to experience the thrill of flying a Mustang in an optionally glow [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

Superior speed and design gave the Mustang an edge in the air over all other contemporary prop fighter designs. Its superior range enabled it to strike targets all the way into Germany. With this Sport Fighter model of the exemplary original, you get to experience the thrill of flying a Mustang in an optionally glow or electric powered ARF. All you need to get in the air is a few hours, a radio system, and a glow or electric power system.

Features:

  • Fast, easy assembly gets you in the air in just a few hours
  • Excellent sport flight characteristics
  • Realistic trim scheme looks great in the air

Specs:

Wingspan 52 in (1320 mm)
Length: 42.5 in (1080 mm)
Requires: 4-channel radio, 5 servos, .46-.55 cu in engine OR 42-50-800kV brushless outrunner motor, 45A ESC (min) and 4S 14.8V 3800mAh LiPo battery.

GPMA1208 – $139.98

gpma1208

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/great-planes-p-51-mustang-sport-fighter-46ep-arf/feed/ 0
Flyzone Select Scale Zero Tx-R Prime And RTF http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/flyzone-japanese-zero-tx-r-prime-and-rtf/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/flyzone-japanese-zero-tx-r-prime-and-rtf/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 21:20:28 +0000 Trevor "Chilly" Duncan http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230607

Long-ranged, fast, and more maneuverable than any Allied aircraft of the time, the Japanese Zero was the ultimate aggressor. With its combination of looks, performance, and unique features, the Flyzone Select Scale Zero is an elegant representation of the power and lethal beauty of the Zero. This bird is authentic all the way from the [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

Long-ranged, fast, and more maneuverable than any Allied aircraft of the time, the Japanese Zero was the ultimate aggressor. With its combination of looks, performance, and unique features, the Flyzone Select Scale Zero is an elegant representation of the power and lethal beauty of the Zero. This bird is authentic all the way from the trim scheme and brushless motor system down to the replica bomb drop and retractable electric landing gear.

The Zero comes in two versions—Tx-R Prime and RTF. If you own a radio, AnyLink adapter, and 3S LiPo battery, the Tx-R Prime can be in the air in minutes. The RTF comes ready to take your flights to
greater heights. Just charge the battery, get out and fly!

Both Feature:

  • Electric retractable landing gear, replica engine, pilot figure and LED lights
  • Assembled, factory-finished airframe
  • Bomb drop
  • Working flaps
  • Powerful brushless motor and ESC
  • Factory-installed SLT receiver compatible with all SLT transmitters and the Tactic AnyLink2

RTF also features:

  • 2.4GHz 6-Channel radio
  • 11.1V 2200mAh LiPo battery
  • DC balancing LiPo charger
  • (4) “AA” batteries

RTF Specs:

Wingspan: 45 in (1145 mm)
RTF Weight: 2.25 -2.5 lb (1020-1130 g)
Length: 37 in (940 mm)
Wing Area: 307 in² (19.8 dm²)
Wing Loading: 17-19 oz/ft² (52-58 g/dm²)
Requires: Nothing!

Tx-R Prime Specs:

Wingspan: 45 in (1145 mm)
RTF Weight: 2.25 -2.5 lb (1020-1130 g)
Length: 37 in (940 mm)
Wing Area: 307 in² (19.8 dm²)
Wing Loading: 17-19 oz/ft² (52-58 g/dm²)
Requires: 6-channel SLT transmitter — or — AnyLink2 and compatible 6-channel transmitter, 11.1V 2200mAh LiPo battery & LiPo charger.

FLZA4322 A6M2 Zero Tx-R Prime. $229.99
FLZA4320 A6M2 Zero RTF. $319.99

Flyzone Japanese Zero Tx-R Prime And RTF

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/flyzone-japanese-zero-tx-r-prime-and-rtf/feed/ 0
Building an F-104 Starfighter in 20 minutes — Video http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/building-a-f-104-starfighter-in-20-minutes-video/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/building-a-f-104-starfighter-in-20-minutes-video/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 20:10:01 +0000 Model Airplane News http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230591

Our good friend and MAN Contributor Sean McHale, is a very talented scale modeler and is an expert RC turbine jet pilot. He has built several impressive jets and also has produced some amazing videos. Here is Sean’s most recent video showing in time-laps images what exactly goes into building a first class, scale RC [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

Our good friend and MAN Contributor Sean McHale, is a very talented scale modeler and is an expert RC turbine jet pilot. He has built several impressive jets and also has produced some amazing videos.

Capture1

Here is Sean’s most recent video showing in time-laps images what exactly goes into building a first class, scale RC turbine powered jet aircraft. Built from an Avonds kit, the F-104 build shows the assembly of the kit and takes us all the way to first flight.. His beautiful Starfighter has all the bells and whistles and it simply looks amazing!

Capture2

Check it out.

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/building-a-f-104-starfighter-in-20-minutes-video/feed/ 0
JR Ninja 3D Quad http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/jr-americas-ninja-400mr-aerobatic-3d-quadcopter-kit/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/jr-americas-ninja-400mr-aerobatic-3d-quadcopter-kit/#comments Tue, 25 Nov 2014 15:37:25 +0000 Trevor "Chilly" Duncan http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230575

From its high-performance radios to its all-out helicopters, JR sets a high standard in quality and design, which is why we are really excited for this new quadcopter! A custom-tuned machine, it has a carbon-fiber main frame, aluminum arms and a polycarbonate top and bottom. We hear it even has 3D aerobatic abilities!! Check out the press [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

From its high-performance radios to its all-out helicopters, JR sets a high standard in quality and design, which is why we are really excited for this new quadcopter! A custom-tuned machine, it has a carbon-fiber main frame, aluminum arms and a polycarbonate top and bottom. We hear it even has 3D aerobatic abilities!!

Check out the press release from JR Americas:

Being a premier manufacturer of helicopters of all sizes and applications for over 20 years now, JR knows a thing or two about rotorcraft. Never a company to simply follow in the footsteps of what everyone else is doing, JR is proud to introduce their clean-sheet-of-paper entry to the multicopter market— the Ninja 400MR. The Ninja is a very high-quality, aerobatic 3D quadcopter that is sure to turn heads wherever it goes It features four independant brushless outrunner motors with fixed pitch propellers designed to reverse direction quickly to make this a very agile model with a very wide performance envelope, yet very simple and lightweight for unreal performance.

Central to its incredible flight characteristics is a custom-tuned, 6-axis gyro stabilization flight control system that plugs directly into your XBus-compatible receiver for simple setup and operation. The core of the Ninja 400MR’s construction is a beautiful carbon fiber main frame with four main aluminum arms and low parts count to get you flying quicker. A beutifully airbrushed polycarbonate canopy protects the Ninja from both the top and underside, as well as concealing and streamlining the radio equipment and battery, and attaches to the chassis with body pins and clips; similar to an R/C car, allowing for easy access to the battery, yet remains secure during flight.

The Ninja is a very complete assembly kit, requiring only an XBus DMSS receiver and JR DMSS transmitter, 3S 2200mAh battery, and a few hours’ worth of your time to get flying. Own a multicopter that stands out ahead of the rest, the Ninja 400MR by JR.

JRP988357 | $419.99 MAP
Available mid-December 2014

JRP988357

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/25/jr-americas-ninja-400mr-aerobatic-3d-quadcopter-kit/feed/ 0
Easy Scratch-built Skis (Get ready for snow!) http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/24/easy-scratch-built-skis-get-ready-for-snow/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/24/easy-scratch-built-skis-get-ready-for-snow/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 16:25:41 +0000 Model Airplane News http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=212853

Now that the first snowfall has hit parts of the country, it’s the perfect time to get prepared for winter flying! This classic how-to from our good friend Roy Vaillancourt provides a great project that will not only use up some of those leftover pieces of wood in your workshop and but also let you enjoy some [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

Now that the first snowfall has hit parts of the country, it’s the perfect time to get prepared for winter flying! This classic how-to from our good friend Roy Vaillancourt provides a great project that will not only use up some of those leftover pieces of wood in your workshop and but also let you enjoy some winter flying. Enjoy!

While reading through an old issue of Model Airplane News, I came across an article about float-flying off water. It started me thinking about how much fun it would be to fly off snow with skis. First on my agenda was to pick some suitable subjects to modify for ski installation. That was the easy part, because my Stinson L-5 Sentinel and Cessna L-19 Bird Dog were just begging to get out of winter storage and be drafted back into service. They are both 1/4-scale tail-draggers and are very suitable for trudging through snow. After working out a few logistics, I cleared a spot on the drafting table and got started. My intent was to come up with a ski design that was simple, easy to build and would use up some of that “leftover” material we all seem to have lying around the shop.

SKI DESIGN
To get a better feel for the design requirements for skis, I took a quick look through some full-size aviation magazines for possible articles on winter flying. I came across an issue of the EAA magazine Sport Aviation. This particular issue had a short article about winter flying with skis. The article contained some neat color photos of two Piper J-3 Cubs on a snow-covered runway at a grass field. The J-3 is probably the most common aircraft that’s outfitted with different brands of skis, and this supplied me with a few ideas on designing a simple, yet effective, set of skis for my own 1/4-scale models.

After measuring the skis and fuselages of the Cubs in the photos, I calculated their comparative lengths, and used these figures to plan the dimensions of my skis. I then generated a rough draft of the full-size drawings for the 1/4-scale skis following the tried-and-true “That looks-about-right” formula (here’s to good old eyeball engineering!). The length of the skis would be approximately 50 percent of the fuselage length, and the axel pivot point would be at 30 to 40 percent of the ski length aft of the ski nose. For the width, I just picked a number that felt right.

MATERIALS
The materials I used for the skis are well-known by all modelers and, depending on the weight of your model, the skis can be made of 1/18, 3/16 or 1/4-inch-thick lite-ply or luane (the plywood material used to skin interior household doors). For models that weigh up to about 15 pounds, use 1/8-inch thick material. For models of 25 pounds or more, I recommend 1/4-inch-thick material (both the L-5 and L-19 are in the lower 20s, so I chose to use 1/4-inch thick lite-ply). I’ve found that metal skis generally mean trouble because snow really likes to stick to cold metal. Wooden skis seem to work better; but just be sure you sand the bottoms silky smooth, seal them well with polyester resin, polyurethane, or epoxy and then apply a good grade of wax. We‚Äôve successfully used beeswax, as well as high-grade automotive paste wax. The wax will prevent the snow from sticking and also will allow the model to really slide across the snow.

Lay out the patterns on a flat piece of material and cut the outlines to shape. To get the nose of the ski to bend up and match the curve of the stiffener, a series of cuts is made across the skis top surface. These cuts are only 1/2 the material thickness deep and are only required in the nose area that needs to bend. This process is called “kerbing‚” and I simply used a utility knife to score these cuts. Just prior to bending this kerbed area, I also fill the cuts with glue so that when all the glue sets, this area will be nice and strong. The center stiffener and the two axle mounts are made of various types of plywood. For 1/4-scale models, the center stiffener is 1/2-inch thick, exterior grade, house-construction plywood, and the two axle mounts are 1/4-inch thick, aircraft plywood. I also like to add spacers to each side of the axle supports so that the final thickness is the same as the wheels that I use on that model. This makes the process of switching from wheels to skis and back again, very easy and fast.

The entire assembly is glued together with 20-minute epoxy and clamped in place to cure. After curing, all the areas are sanded and then coated with epoxy and sanded again. Next, they are painted with a couple of coats of paint and topped off with some clear polyurethane or epoxy.

FUSELAGE CONSIDERATIONS
 One of the neatest things about this design is the ease with which you can switch from wheels to skis. This is very important when you get that unexpected snowfall and last-minute calls from your flying buddies to meet them at the field. It will take only a few minutes to change from wheels to skis.

There is only one modification needed for the fuselage; two pairs of eyehooks need to be installed to act as attachment points for the cables. Install two in front of the landing gear, one on each side. Attach the skis’ nose bungee and safety cable (more on these later) to these eyehooks ahead of the landing gear. The other two eyehooks go aft of the landing gear, (again, one on each side of the fuselage), the rear-extension limiting cables will be attached to these. To make these attachments sturdy, I simply epoxy some hardwood blocks inside the fuselage and permanently screw the eyehooks into place (see photos). I leave these in place all year long, so I do not have to make any changes when the weather makes an unexpected turn. I painted these eyehooks to match the fuselage and this way, they just get camouflaged and disappear very nicely.

SKI SETUP
To set up your skis properly, there are two basic, yet very important alignments to maintain.

Toe-in: The skis must be parallel to each other, as well as to the fuselage centerline (a function of the landing gear-axle toe-in adjustment).

Angle of attack: The skis’ angle of attack must be approximately 10 degrees positive while the aircraft is in flight (a function of the bungee and aft limiting-cable adjustments).

The nose bungee is big rubber bands that lift the tips of the skis. To limit how high the ski noses rise, you have to adjust the lengths of the rear-limiting cables. I like to make these adjustments on the workbench with the skis mounted on the axles (held in place with wheel collars) and the airplane’s tail propped up. To get the required 10 degrees of ski nose-up attitude, I keep the skis flat on the bench and then raise the tails that the plane’s nose is set at a flight attitude of negative 10 degrees. A stack of paint cans works very well here! If you’ve set everything up properly, when you lift the model off the bench, the bungee cords will lift the noses of the skis and make the aft limiting cable taut. When the model is placed on the ground, the aft cables should slacken and the skis should lie flat. It’s important that they also be able to pivot freely on the axles. As an added safety measure, I suggest you run a safety cable alongside the nose bungee. This cable is adjusted when the model is sitting on the ground in the normal “at rest” attitude. The safety cable is attached at the same spots as the bungee, yet at this attitude, this cable should be taut. The idea here is that in the event of a bungee failing, you do not want the ski to turn nose-down on you in flight as it makes for a very messy landing. To make it easy to attach the bungee cords and cables, I install line connectors or some other form of “quick-disconnect” device at the fuselage attachment points. Old control-line connectors work well and you might also find similar connectors in a fishing-tackle store.

To make it easier to remove the wheels from my models, I replace the usual wheel collars with cotter pins that go into small holes drilled through the end of the axles.

TIPS ON SNOW FLYING
 With all the shop work finished, now it’s time to head to the field. The toughest part is waiting for the snow and then having it arrive at just the right time, like on a Friday night so that Saturday can be a day at the field with nice fresh snow. I live on Long Island, NY, and we don’t usually get much snow, but last winter we had so much snow that it was difficult to get to the field! Regardless of how much snow we get, when we get an opportunity like this, the “Snow Bird Squadron” gets together and makes it to the field for some really great, off-ski flights.

When flying off snow, remember these tips:

  • You’ll need to apply slightly more power to taxi. If you have no ski attached to the tail wheel, the rudder will also need a blast of power for turning.
  • You’ll need more power for takeoff, and the skis will have to “plane” on the snow before you’ll be able to build up air speed. To overcome torque, apply the throttle gradually and smoothly and feed in the rudder as required (just as if you were flying off a green runway). You may need a bit more elevator to prevent the model from attempting to nose over, but once the speed builds up and the skis are “on plane” you’ll be able to release the elevator. When it’s equipped with skis, your model will not fly as fast because skis increase drag. When flying with wheels, don’t expect to pull up as steeply.
  • Increase power during landings and use a slightly nose-high, three-point, or wheel-landing approach to keep the tips of the skis up. For short-field operations with my L-5, I particularly like the “I have arrived, three-point, plop-type” of landing. The fun part for me is just shooting touch-and-go’s one after another.

Using scale-snow skis is a really easy way to extend your flying season. Before heading out, make sure all your radio gear is up to snuff. Cold weather wreaks havoc with batteries, as well as people. Just dress warmly, you don’t want frostbitten ears, toes or flying thumbs and be sure to take along some hot coffee or hot chocolate. Oh yes, and sunglasses are definitely in order. Enjoy!

Here are all the wooden parts cut out for one set of skis (see text for details).


Closeup view of the kerf cuts and how they help to bend the nose up to match the curve of the center support.

All the parts glued and clamped in place to cure. Lead bars and clamps (and anything else that is heavy) aid the process.

Another means of  “clamping”  the assembly is to use anything from around the shop that is heavy such as a can of Bondo or old car parts.

Close up of the axle attachment area with filler pieces between the uprights and on the outsides to make the attachment area the same width as the wheel originally used. Note the cotter pin and washer. Very easy installation.

With fuselage propped up so the nose is slightly down you can see the rear attachment cable is taught and the front bungee stretched.

Same as photo 6 but fuselage attachment points can also be seen.

Roy Vaillancourt designed and built this 1/4-scale Stinson L-5. It weighs 21 pounds and is powered by a US-41 engine. Latex paint (but of course).

Roy Vaillancourt designed and built this 1/4-scale Stinson L-5. It weighs 21 pounds and is powered by a US-41 engine. Latex paint (but of course).

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/24/easy-scratch-built-skis-get-ready-for-snow/feed/ 4
Prepare for landing! http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/22/prepare-for-landing/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/22/prepare-for-landing/#comments Sat, 22 Nov 2014 22:36:34 +0000 Model Airplane News http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230562

Someone told me once that landing is the only maneuver that we fly that is absolutely mandatory. If you think about it, this makes complete sense. We don’t have to take off, but once we do, the only thing that we must do is land! So, once you have takeoff down, it’s a good idea [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

Someone told me once that landing is the only maneuver that we fly that is absolutely mandatory. If you think about it, this makes complete sense. We don’t have to take off, but once we do, the only thing that we must do is land! So, once you have takeoff down, it’s a good idea to make sure you are 100% competent in landing.

The tricky part about landing is the fact that you will be flying so close to stall. Unlike full-scale pilots, we do not have an airspeed indicator and the connection to the plane that allows us to feel the stall. However, to me, landing a model aircraft is still very much a “by feel” thing. We just feel the stall in a different sense. The way we feel it is in our thumb that is on the stick that controls the elevator. As our model flies slower, the wing will need a higher angle of attack to maintain altitude. Therefore, while you are setting up for landing, if you suddenly have a need to add more and more elevator to maintain your altitude, it is time to add throttle to avoid the impending stall.

Now, let’s talk about the hardest concept to grasp. When flying a model airplane, especially during landing, the concept is this: elevator controls speed, while throttle controls rate of descent/ascent. Most people believe the opposite to be true. This is painfully obvious when you are flying close to the ground and you run out of up-elevator and your plane comes crashing to the ground. The biggest mistake people make is using elevator alone to try to maintain their descent to landing. Instead you want to use throttle to slow your descent and avoid contact with the ground and elevator to slow the plane down, as it gets closer to touchdown.

MAKING LIFE EASIER

With a tricycle gear you can afford to bring the nose a little higher without worrying about losing control of the model once on the ground. We will try to cover this in a future article.

Landing at different fields can add to the complexity of landing a “difficult” model. When you are landing a model that you need to focus on flying, you will want to lighten the load wherever you can. Here are a few things that I use to make things easier on my brain. The first things that I like to utilize are landmarks. When I first arrive at a new field I will take a few minutes to scan the area and look for visual landmarks. Some of my favorites are peaks of hills or mountains in the background, power poles, trees, or other things that stand out to the eye. Next is knowing the stall characteristics of the model that I am flying. Anytime I fly a new model I like to take her up to altitude once I know everything is working as it should and pull the throttle back. I then apply more and more elevator until I reach stall and see what the plane’s response is. This will remove any surprises when I am on final and altitude is at a premium. These two pointers can help save a number of models if you take the time to utilize them anytime you are at a new field or flying a new model.

DIFFICULT-TO-LAND MODELS

Although it’s not a warbird, you can use the steps in this article to help increase your success rate when landing aerobatic biplanes like the Checkmate pictured here.

Notice the nose level attitude while landing this warbird. The increased airspeed helps to maintain rudder authority on touchdown.

Of the different configurations of models, the tail-dragger plane is definitely more difficult to land well. Of course, we have to count out the “floaty” 3D models and aerobatic planes such as the Extras and Edges that are so popular.

In general, our models are not difficult to land. Even most of our “heavy-metal” warbird models are so lightly wing loaded that they really don’t qualify as a “difficult” to land aircraft. However, even though they don’t have high wing loading, the fact that many of them are tail draggers makes this the “trickiest” class to land so we will focus here.

So, what qualifies as a good landing with a tail-dragging warbird? To me, it is a nice, 2-point touchdown with no bounces and a controlled rollout. The most common mistake we make, as modelers, is not carrying enough speed when landing our warbirds. Just because the wing will fly down to a walking pace does not mean that is the speed we should land these models. Landing too slow will cause the bounces and uncontrolled rollout previously mentioned.

I will first address airspeed. I like to land my models about 5 to 10mph above stall speed. This keeps enough airflow traveling over the vertical fin and rudder to control yaw on touchdown as well as over the horizontal stab and elevator to keep enough pitch authority to minimize bouncing.

The next point of conversation is the attitude of the model. Unlike the 3D aerobatic planes we want to come in with the nose fairly level. Try to avoid coming in nose high like a jet fighter. This just leads to trouble.

The third bullet point would be the flare. Since we have ample airspeed to keep the plane flying the flare is going to be more of a leveling out. I like to flare at about 6 inches above the runway. Once I level the plane off at this altitude, I will pull the throttle back to idle and allow the plane to slow. As the wheels get to the point of contact with the tarmac I will slowly release the back pressure on the elevator lessening the tendency of the tail to drop which creates a positive angle of attack of the wings, which will ultimately lead to the model taking to the skies again unintentionally.

Once the main wheels are solidly on the ground, I focus on my rudder control and be sure to keep the model tracking as close to the centerline as possible.

Finally, once my plane’s air speed is below flight speed, I will slowly add the up-elevator back in to firmly plant the tailwheel on the ground to avoid the undesirable nose over that we have all witnessed at the field.

FINAL WORD

If you take the tips above and focus on improving your skills one at a time, you definitely will see an improvement in your landing skills. All of the above points have proper timing. Additionally, every model you fly will require different timing for each of the points. Be patient and work on each step one at a time with every model you fly. Eventually, everything above will become second nature and you will not hesitate to fly any new model no matter how “scary” it is supposed to be on landing. Now get out there and shoot some landings!   By Jason Benson

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/22/prepare-for-landing/feed/ 3
Flitework Red Bull Planes http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/20/tower-hobbies-named-exclusive-distributor-of-flitework-red-bull-licensed-aircraft/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/20/tower-hobbies-named-exclusive-distributor-of-flitework-red-bull-licensed-aircraft/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 21:33:03 +0000 Trevor "Chilly" Duncan http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230551

RC Red Bull air racers? Count us in! We are so excited to get our hands on these bad boys we can’t wait! Some of these are larger built-up planes, and there are smaller foam planes for electric enthusiasts. And all of your favorites are here: Extras, Edges, Stearmans, Zlins … you name it, they’ve [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

RC Red Bull air racers? Count us in! We are so excited to get our hands on these bad boys we can’t wait! Some of these are larger built-up planes, and there are smaller foam planes for electric enthusiasts. And all of your favorites are here: Extras, Edges, Stearmans, Zlins … you name it, they’ve got it. Here’s the press release from Tower Hobbies:

Flitework, one of the R/C industry’s most respected brands, is proud to introduce a series of models inspired by the Flying Bulls aircraft flown by the Red Bull Air Force! Available exclusively through Tower Hobbies, these exciting models are officially licensed, incredibly detailed and designed to rock and roll. Choices range from receiver-ready foam aircraft like the 47.2” span PT-17 Stearman to wood ARFs like the 63.4” span ZLIN Z-50 LX and 66.9” span Edge 540 1700 mm.

For more details on these and more exclusive Flitework products, visit towerhobbies.com!

FLWA4004 – Flying Bulls ZLIN Z-50 LX ARF – $349.98
FLWA4090 – Red Bull Edge 540 1700mm ARF – $449.97
FLWA4110 – Red Bull PT-17 Stearman RR – $229.98

Gallery > Tower Hobbies Named Exclusive Distributor Of Flitework Red Bull Licensed Aircraft

Tags:

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/20/tower-hobbies-named-exclusive-distributor-of-flitework-red-bull-licensed-aircraft/feed/ 0
Half-Scale Christen Eagle http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/20/half-scale-christen-eagle/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/20/half-scale-christen-eagle/#comments Thu, 20 Nov 2014 13:58:34 +0000 Debra Cleghorn http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230538

With its distinctive multi-color feather motif, the Christen Eagle has been impressing airshow attendees for over 40 years. But when’s the last time you saw a 55% RC model perform? Lucky for us, the father and son team of Pete and Dean Coxon took this video of Robbie Skipton’s giant aircraft at the Large Model Association [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

With its distinctive multi-color feather motif, the Christen Eagle has been impressing airshow attendees for over 40 years. But when’s the last time you saw a 55% RC model perform? Lucky for us, the father and son team of Pete and Dean Coxon took this video of Robbie Skipton’s giant aircraft at the Large Model Association Much Marcle event in the United Kingdom. Enjoy!

man

 

 

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/20/half-scale-christen-eagle/feed/ 11
HobbyKing AC-10 Gyrocopter EPO 1320mm (PNF) http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/19/hobbyking-ac-10-gyrocopter-epo-1320mm-pnf/ http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/19/hobbyking-ac-10-gyrocopter-epo-1320mm-pnf/#comments Wed, 19 Nov 2014 20:28:32 +0000 Trevor "Chilly" Duncan http://www.modelairplanenews.com/?p=230534

For those of you looking for a new flying experience, the AC-10 Gyrocopter is just the ticket. This model will be especially appealing to those who fly both helicopters and fixed wing aircraft, as this model falls somewhere in between. With its very unique flight characteristics, the AC-10 is by far one of the most [...]

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>

For those of you looking for a new flying experience, the AC-10 Gyrocopter is just the ticket. This model will be especially appealing to those who fly both helicopters and fixed wing aircraft, as this model falls somewhere in between. With its very unique flight characteristics, the AC-10 is by far one of the most interesting models we have ever flown. Modeled as a stand off scale model, intended to look like many of the full scale home built gyro copters, the AC-10 has a host of details typically not seen in a foamie, plug and fly model.

The exterior airframe is of molded EPO foam, but remove the large canopy and you will find a nice laser cut plywood and aluminum frame which supports the motor, tail boom, landing gear and the CNC aluminum alloy rotor head. That nice ball bearing supported rotor head spins flat bottom carbon fiber rotor blades! Metal gear servos with nice alloy arms control the two axis rotor head. To get the weight balance correctly, the motor is mounted up front and drives a long ball bearing supported shaft to the aft mounted pusher propeller. Adding to the quality of the model is the two stage paint process the foam parts go through. They are color painted, decals applied, and then a clear coat is put over the entire part to seal the decals for better longevity.

Check out the AC-10 Gyrocopter if you are looking for something completely different!

Features:

  • Plug and fly – just install battery and radio with elevon mixing
  • EPO foam exterior with rugged plywood and aluminum under structure
  • 2 axis CNC aluminum alloy ball bearing supported rotor head
  • Flat bottom molded carbon fiber rotor blades
  • Detailed instruction manual included
  • Heavy duty metal gear servos with alloy control arms
  • Steerable nose wheel and active rudder
  • Unique Flying Experience

Specs:

Rotor Diameter: 1320mm
Length: 940mm
Height: 690mm
Weight: 2200g
Motor: 4250 Outrunner
ESC: 60A
Max Battery Dimensions: 140x43x30mm

Requires:

4 Channel Transmitter and Receiver w/ Elevon Mixing
4S 14.8V 3000~3300mAh Lipoly battery

#267000004-0 – $340.20

Gallery > HobbyKing AC-10 Gyrocopter EPO 1320mm (PNF)

Tags:

Model Airplane News - The #1 resource for RC plane and helicopter enthusiasts featuring news, videos, product releases and tech tips.

]]>
http://www.modelairplanenews.com/blog/2014/11/19/hobbyking-ac-10-gyrocopter-epo-1320mm-pnf/feed/ 0