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  1. Brilliant! Takes KISS to the next level!

    Another great tip is to limit 15 degrees for first flights on sport airplanes, especially elevator throws.

  2. A great easy to understand method of setting up your plane.
    many thanks for putting this video up

  3. Most planes do not have rectangular wings such that the root length is the same as the wing tip length…

    With a tapered wing one must first find the MAC, mean aerodynamics cord, mark it’s position on the wing , then on this line from the leading edge to the trailing edge you can then apply the simplistic 1/4 to 1/3 marks for balancing the model.

    The Mac is found by adding the g root length and tip length and dividing by 2. Then measure this distance from the root at the fuse toward the tip and mark the MAC.

  4. I have been modeling since 1966 and this the first time that I have heard this, I will be using these tips quit soon.

  5. WHAT ABOUT BI-PLANES AND TAPERED WINGS?

  6. Great process Gerry, it is also helpful to put these marks for the 25 & 33% on the bottom of the wing where your fingers go to lift the plane.. Gives you a little better idea of where you are actually lifting.. Thanks for the help!
    Terry

  7. 30 plus years in this hobby and this is the best I have ever seen
    KISS !! why did this take so long.

  8. Very straightforward but in my opinion lacking and over simplified, what about tapered or swept back or swept forward wings, the MAC equation is always necessary and although it often works out to be at around the 30-40% of chord mark it is not prudent to declare this as an accurate method based on that for all wing types

  9. Great method for the basic setting of a Constant Chord Aircraft. However, that KISS method will not apply to tapered or eleptical aircraft. THAT NEEDS TO BE CLARIFIED……..Otherwise, someone is going to crash that new aerobatic plane! I know it’s rough having to use the Mean Air Chord formula, but I always use it BEFORE I FLY (to check the recommended Center of Gravity (C/G) that is recommended for the plane. I’ve found that many manufacturer’s SET IT TAIL HEAVY so the 3-D stuff will be wild enough!

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