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7 Great Workshop Tips

7 Great Workshop Tips
From pull-pull control systems to getting the most out of that bottle of CA, our team of editors and contributors has the answers you’re looking for. Here are 8 workshop tips that we hope will make your time in the shop more enjoyable and efficient. Enjoy!

Fine-Tuning Control Horns
When it comes to using a pull-pull control system, it is extremely important that you set up the geometry correctly. Measure the distance between the attachment points on the two-sided servo arm and make sure the distance between the attachment points on the horns on the control surface are the same. Oftentimes, standard control horns will be too short, so to solve the mismatch, use thin plywood shims between the control surface and the two horns. If the distances are not the same, the pull-pull cables will become slack on one side or the other as the servo moves the control surface.

 

 

Easy Markings
It has always been troublesome for me to use a stencil mask and spray paint to apply markings to my models. Paint always seeps under the edge and the markings don’t come out great. To improve the looks of my models, I have started to use a permanent marker and a reusable stencil to draw the outlines. Then I fill in the stenciled markings. This method works great on foam, Depron, film, plastic, and any other type of electric-powered model surface.

 

 

Secure Bullet Connectors
When it comes to doing the hard wiring for large electric motors like this Hacker A60–16L, which powers my giant OV-10 Bronco twin, I don’t take any chances with bullet connectors. Even the best-performing model can have some vibration issues. Although bullet connectors are very tight fitting, I apply some heat-shrink tubing over the connectors. They hold everything securely and it’s easy to remove in case I need to do maintenance on the motors or the wiring. This will serve as cheap flight insurance!

 

Non-magnetic screws
When it comes time to install screws deep inside an airplane, we usually rely on a magnetic tip screwdriver. But often, the screws used to hold hardware in place may be made of non-ferrous metal. To help get the screw in its rightful place, try this trick. Use some tape, push the screw through it, and then place it on the end of the screwdriver. Next, fold the ends of the tape up against the screwdriver shaft and you’ve got a screw that won’t fall off. Simple and very easy.

 

 

 

Awl for one
For a quick way to make a hole for a screw in balsa, you can use a sharpened awl instead of a small drill bit. Simply push the awl straight into the wood and twist. This works equally as well with light ply. To strengthen the hole, thread the screw into place and then remove it. Add a drop or two of thin CA glue and replace the screw.

 

 

 

Screwdriver I.D.
To help me find tools more quickly in my flightline toolbox, I use small, medium, and/or large white labels to mark the shafts of Phillips-head and common screwdrivers to identify their type and size in my electric flight box.

 

 

 

In a squeeze
CA glues are sensitive to moisture in the air and can thicken and/or harden in the bottle. To help prevent the glue from spoiling, I squeeze out the air before I replace the cap. This minimizes the amount of air/moisture in the bottle and helps the glue last longer.

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Updated: August 25, 2016 — 10:54 AM

11 Comments

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  1. GOOD JOB

  2. Good stuff, keep them coming and many thanks to everyone.

  3. I just Love these TIPS!! After being in RC since 1974 I still to this day “do not know everything!” I scratch build and build from kits so many of these tips are really helpful. THANKS Alex

  4. A other great way to keep your ca longer useful.
    Keep your ca glues and ca gel in a refrigerator ,in a airtight plastic container,you can keep ca glues for months without getting bad .

  5. For the CA, I also keep mine in the freezer, keeps foe ever. I d not have to throw away half used bottles anymore.

  6. I love the tape on the screw trick, just disgusted I didn’t think of it

  7. Over time Acetone will dissolve CA.
    I keep a small jar of acetone, with a tight fitting lid, on my bench. I throw old plugged CA tips in there and let them soak.
    When you need a clean tip, get one out of the jar and throw the plugged one in for the next time.

  8. a better way to keep ca glue is to put it into a freezer it will literally keep for years in an open bottle

  9. Be cautious expelling the air out of the CA bottle. When the bottle is re- opened, the fresh humid air will be sucked in.
    The caps are unlikely to be glue safe and will bond to the spout at some stage, so just leave it off and store the bottle on a rack. Refrigerating before initial use is beneficial, but bring the contents to room temperature before opening to prevent humid air being sucked in.

  10. TO MAKE YOUR CA LAST FOREVER,KEEP ALL OF YOUR CA’S IN THE REFRIGERATOR
    I’VE BEEN OUT OF MODELING FOR THREE YEARS NOW AND I’M NOW BACK IN AND FLYING.
    DURING MY BREAK IN FLYING,MY THIN,MEDIUM AND GAP FILLING CA’S WERE KEPT IN THE
    REFRIGERATOR.MY THIN CA IS JUST AS THIN NOW AS THE DAY I PUT IT IN THE REFRIGERATOR THREE YEARS AGO.

  11. I always plug my CA tips with the nylon/plastic/whatever price tag locks from any pice of clothing, shoes, towels. Ca doesn’t stick to the stuf & if it does, just cut it off or use another piece. I already have a lifetime supply.

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